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Revealed: How parts of Britain are now poorer than POLAND with families in Wales and Cornwall among Europe’s worst off

Revealed: How parts of Britain are now poorer than POLAND with families in Wales and Cornwall among Europe’s worst off

  • Seven areas of Britain poorer than ANYWHERE in France or Germany
  • Welsh Valleys is one of the Continent’s poverty blackspots
  • Poles, Lithuanians and Hungarians wealthier than the Cornish
  • Outside London, only Home Counties and Aberdeen keep up with Germany

EXCLUSIVE By TOM MCTAGUE, MAIL ONLINE DEPUTY POLITICAL EDITOR

Extracts from the Mail online Published by Jack Clarkson.

Parts of Britain are now poorer than Poland, Lithuania and Hungary, official figures reveal.

People in the Welsh Valleys and Cornwall – Britain’s two poorest areas – scrape by on less than £14,300 a year on average.

Because Britain is so expensive, this leaves families in these areas worse off than those vast swathes of Eastern Europe, according to an EU study.

In much of the UK, people's incomes are well below the EU average - in some areas by as much as a third. In the map (above) Britain's poorest regions are highlighted, showing how far below the European average incomes have fallen. The Cornish, for example, are 36 per cent less well-off than the EU norm. Families in Slovenia meanwhile are just 16 per cent poorer - and in Portugal 23 per cent. Click on Map to Enlarge

In much of the UK, people’s incomes are well below the EU average – in some areas by as much as a third. In the map (above) Britain’s poorest regions are highlighted, showing how far below the European average incomes have fallen. The Cornish, for example, are 36 per cent less well-off than the EU norm. Families in Slovenia meanwhile are just 16 per cent poorer – and in Portugal 23 per cent.

In Lincolnshire and Durham, the next two poorest areas in Britain, people live on less than £16,500 a year.

This puts them in the same bracket as Estonians and rural Poles, once prices are taken into account.

Britain as a whole fares a little better, with average earnings of £23,300 – just over the EU average of £20,750. But this still leaves us out of the top 10 wealthiest countries in the EU.

And this figure is propped up by Europe’s runaway richest region – inner London. In the heart of the capital the average GDP per person is £71,000 a year.

This is 321 per cent of the average across the EU, according to Brussels’s official statistics arm Eurostat.

While Britain is home to Europe's richest city, most of the country is poorer than the Continent

While Britain is home to Europe’s richest city, most of the country is poorer than the Continent

EUROPE’S 10 RICHEST AREAS

London is far and away Europe’s capital of cash – with incomes 300% the EU average

Here are the top 10 richest cities:

  1. Central London (321% of EU average)
  2. Luxembourg (266%)
  3. Brussels, Belgium (222%)
  4. Hamburg, Germany (202%)
  5. Oslo, Norway (189%)
  6. Bratislava, Slovakia (186%)
  7. Île de France, France (182%)
  8. Groningen, Holland (182%)
  9. Stockholm, Sweden (173%)
  10. Prague, Czech Republic (171%)

But central London’s soaring wealth has failed to trickle down to much of the rest of the country, the figures suggest.

Britain’s seven most hard-up areas – including Lancashire, Leicestershire, South Yorkshire and Staffordshire – are poorer than ANY region in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Finland, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Sweden and Austria.

The region of “West Wales and the Valleys” is now in the top five poorest areas in Western Europe – with families HALF as wealthy as their German counterparts on average.

The only parts of Britain matching Germany for wealth – outside central London – are “Berkshire, Buckinghamshire & Oxfordshire” and oil-rich “North East Scotland” around Aberdeen.

But even England’s second wealthiest area – with average incomes of £32,000 – fails to make it into Europe’s top 20 rich league.

Only North East Scotland, with an average GDP per person of £33,000, sneaks into Europe’s Premier League of wealth.

Eurostat, which is Brussels’ equivalent of the Office for National Statistics, measures wealth across the EU using a measure known as ‘purchasing power standards’.

This aims to measure GDP per person but also ‘takes into account differences in national price levels’, to give a more realistic idea of how much the cash in people’s pockets is actually worth.

On this basis, four of the UK’s 37 regions struggle by on less than 75 per cent of the average EU earnings, alongside 15 in Poland, nine in Greece, seven in the Czech Republic and Romania, six in Hungary and five in Bulgaria and Italy.

Areas of Britain are being left behind by London - and much of Europe

Families in Krakow, Poland, enjoy the sunshine - and a better standard of living than many in Britain

Towns in Britain are not only being left behind by wealthy parts of the South East – but also by much of the Continent, including former Communist countries in Eastern Europe like Krakow (above, right)

Former mining villages in Britain, like Easington Colliery in County Durham, are now poorer than much of Eastern Europe

Booming Vilnius in Lithuania

Former mining villages, like Easington Colliery in County Durham (pictured left) are now poorer than booming cities in Eastern Europe like Vilnius (right) in Lithuania

Alongside Britain Portugal also has four poverty regions. Slovakia has three, Spain two and Croatia and Slovenia one each.

Families in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania – which are so small that they each only count as a single region – also live on less than 75 per cent of the EU average, according to the figures.

Overall, there are just eight regions of the UK wealthier than the EU average. The remaining 29 areas are poorer.

The Valleys and Cornwall are in the top 50 poorest regions of the whole of Europe – and in the top 10 deprived areas of Western Europe, according to the purchasing power league table.

Eleven regions have incomes at least 20 per cent below the European average.

Shadow Treasury minister Chris Leslie told MailOnline the figures were a wake up call for Britain.

He said: ‘No other European country would tolerate such a gap between its rich and poor regions.

‘To allow so many parts of the country to fall behind not only London, but most of Europe, is shocking. We’ve got to take more action to have balanced prosperity.

‘The challenge of the next few years is to help these parts of the country that have been left neglected.’

The Labour MP added: ‘It is shocking to think parts of Britain are now poorer than Poland and other areas of Eastern Europe.

‘When you start to take into account the prices people are having to pay in these areas – especially after seeing their incomes squeezed for years now – the contrast with Europe is even more stark.’

Whole streets in some of Britain's great towns and cities, like this one in Salford, have been abandoned.

Whole streets in some of Britain’s great towns and cities, like this one in Salford, have been abandoned.

 

 

 

 

‘YOU GOV POLL’ ~ UKIP posters are NOT racist, says British public

UKIP posters are NOT racist, says British public

UKIP’s new posters may have been branded “awful” and “racist” by various MPs but the British public thinks otherwise – the majority of them, anyway.

According to a YouGov poll of over 2,100 people, 59% of British public think the posters are not racist and 53% disagree that they are offensive and ignorant.

Fifty seven per cent agree the posters are a “hard-hitting reflection of reality”.

UKIP leader Nigel Farage launched the £1.5m anti-immigration ad campaign last week. Bankrolled by ex-Tory donor and business tycoon Paul Sykes, the posters show a builder begging for spare change with the tagline: “EU policy at work. British workers are hit hard by unlimited cheap labour.”

Another poster says that “26 million people in Europe are looking for work. And whose jobs are they after?”

UKIP poster

UKIP poster

 

Take a look at the charts for the poll results:

UKIP ad campaign poll

UKIP ad campaign poll

Image source: YouGov

‘STAGECOACH BUS COMPANY’ NOT AT ALL PENSIONER FRIENDLY AT STOCKSBRIDGE

1925wa-lr

Old Sheffield Corporation Bus

(Changes to OAP Bus travel from 1st April 2014 involving bus passes.)

At a recent Town Council meeting Councillors received complaints regarding the service no. 57 and its revised timetable.  It appears that the service will operate leaving the terminus at Unsliven Road, Stocksbridge at 9.25am weekdays.  Due to the impending changes to OAP’s travel passes which will result in them not being able to travel for free prior to 9.30am Councillors are requesting that serious consideration is given to the service commencement time being amended from 9.25am to 9.30am.  Otherwise it would mean senior citizens would have to wait until 9.55am in order to be able to travel for free – this could impede them from being able to attend early hospital/doctor appointments etc.

Jack Clarkson UKIP Town Councillor for Stocksbridge has written to SYPTE to try and get Stage coach to change the start time of the number 57 bus to 9.30am in order that many pensioners can use the bus to travel into Sheffield for Hospital and other such appointments. He said “for some time Stagecoach knew that pensioners wouldn’t be able to use their passes before 9.30am. When they revised the 57 bus time table they seemingly changed the start time of the 57 service to 9.25am in order pensioners couldn’t use the bus.

Ironically you will not be able to board the 57 bus at the terminus on Unsliven Road with your OAP bus  at 9.25am, from 1st April, but when the bus reaches the Garden Village estate at around 9.30am estate pensioners can board the bus .

“Stagecoach customer relations/service beggars believe, they are being uncaring and inconsiderate to elderly people in the Smithymoor area of Stocksbridge.

Due to the fact Stocksbridge is 12 miles away from Sheffield they could have made an exception and adjusted the time table by five minutes. This would have en-captured all of the elderly pensioners in the Stocksbridge community, after all we have the highest proportion of elderly people in our community in Sheffield. Stagecoach are not at all pensioner friendly out here at Stocksbridge.”

Author Jack Clarkson