Category Archives: Building New Homes

Notice of Motion by Jack Clarkson regarding new homes in Stocksbridge and Upper Don

Notice of motion given by Councillor Jack Clarkson / seconded by Councillor Keith Davis

That this Council notes that over 800 new homes are to be built in the Upper Don Valley catchment area of Sheffield.

417 new homes are to be built at Station Road, Deepcar.

120 new homes are to be built on the new ‘Fox Valley bottom’, Manchester Road, Stocksbridge, and over 300 new homes to be built on the proposed new development at the Old paper mill site, between Oughtibridge and Wharncliffe side.

Is further concerned that there will be a substantial increase in vehicular traffic on local roads as a result of the proposed developments, a conservative estimate would assume at least an additional 1700 vehicles in the area, including additional vehicles visiting the new ‘Fox Valley’ retail shopping centre at Stocksbridge.

Believes that this Council should take immediate steps to begin the process, of extending the Super tram/rail link between Middlewood and the newly built ‘Fox Valley’ shopping development at Stocksbridge, with tram/rail stops at Oughtibridge, Wharncliffe Side, Deepcar and Stocksbridge, and supports the Don Valley Railway plans submitted to the City Council in 2012 of the popularity of the idea of re-using the freight line to Stocksbridge for passenger services.

Recognises the fact that additional car journeys will create an increase in carbon dioxide emissions and traffic congestion, that will impact on the environment and therefore local people’s health.

Welcomes the fact that Sheffield City Council, have already taken an interest in Government Regeneration Agency URBED who advocate satellite settlements that are included in future housing provision such as Stocksbridge, have “light-rail links to city centres to accommodate new economic growth over the next 15 years.

Further believes that a new Super tram/rail link would be efficient and convenient for both local residents and visitors to use and would be environmentally cleaner and would alleviate much of the existing congestion at ‘traffic pinch points, in the areas such as Catch Bar Lane and Penistone Road which have for many years caused chaos for local people travelling to and from the city centre during the morning and evening rush hour.

Stocksbridge Steelworks back to passenger use.

This is not the first time Don Valley Railway have reminded the City Council of the popularity of the idea of re-using the freight line to Stocksbridge for passenger services. In 2014 a petition of nearly 3000 Don Valley Signators was presented to the City Council. on Valley Railway for the past ten years has campaigned to bring the current freight only rail line

Don Valley Railway would urge all Upper Don Valley Residents to respond to South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive’s consultation which closes on 30 October and let them know where you think the Tram should go.

417 new homes are to be built at Station Road, Deepcar.

120 new homes are to be built on the new ‘Fox Valley bottom’, Manchester Road, Stocksbridge.

300 new homes to be built at a proposed new development on the old paper mill site, Oughtibridge.

Believes that this Council should take immediate action to begin the process, of extending the Super tram/train link between Middlewood and the newly built ‘Fox Valley’ shopping development with stops at Oughtibridge, Wharncliffe Side, Deepcar and Stocksbridg en route.

To prepare and ensure that the highway infrastructure of the area is fit for purpose.

Is further concerned that there will be a substantial increase in vehicular traffic on local roads as a result of the proposed developments; a conservative estimate would assume at least an additional 1500 vehicles for new residents in the area, plus extra vehicles visiting the new ‘Fox Valley’ retail shopping centre.

Recognises that the new residents in these developments will need to drive their children to and from school and attend their place of work, creating an increase in carbon dioxide emissions and traffic congestion.

Further believes that a new Super tram/train link would be efficient and convenient for both local residents and visitors to use, would be environmentally cleaner and would alleviate much of the existing congestion at ‘traffic pinch points’ in the areas of Catch Bar Lane and Penistone Road which have for many years caused chaos for local people travelling to and from the city centre during the morning and evening rush hour.

To do nothing and pretend that traffic will continue to flow as at present is not a solution.  If a new Super tram/ rain link is not actioned as soon as possible, traffic will crawl ever more slowly into and out of our city, increasing levels of air pollution, and resulting in all roads eventually leading to chaos rather than the intended destination.

Building New Homes

INCENTIVISING BROWNFIELD DEVELOPMENT

It would be possible to build up to 2.5 million houses on brownfield sites, if developers were less reluctant to take advantage of this rich source of potential housing land. Problems with remediation of derelict land that has had a previous use and may have contamination issues to address can be off-putting to potential developers. This is despite the fact technology to clean up sites and make them fit for new development is now readily available.

We will take steps to remove the barriers to brownfield builds with the aim of building one million homes on brownfield sites by 2025 to address the current housing shortage.

UKIP will require the Environment Agency to compile a National Brownfield Sites Register and provide a remediation assessment where appropriate.

The following financial incentives will be offered to encourage developers to build on brownfield sites:

• Grants of up to £10,000 per unit will be available to developers to carry out essential remediation work.

• Properties built on registered brownfield sites will be exempt from stamp duty on first sale, up to the £250,000 threshold.

• A grant to cover the cost of indemnity insurance will also be available to developers of decontaminated land. To further incentivise brownfield development, local authorities will be allowed to keep the New Homes Bonus beyond six years on brownfield sites.

BUILDING AFFORDABLE HOMES

We will increase the supply of affordable housing by:

• Identifying long-term dormant land held by central and local government so it can be released for affordable developments

• Relax planning regulations for the conversion of off-high road commercial and office space and other existing buildings to affordable residential use.

There is a dire shortage of affordable housing in Britain. Many of those who would like to own their own home are simply unable to even contemplate it. They are ‘locked out’ of home ownership.

BELIEVE in BRITAIN

While these measures will help address the housing shortage, we cannot just build our way out of the housing crisis. Our housing policy needs to be seen within a wider context of addressing the issue of supply and demand. Controlling the numbers of new migrants coming to Britain is one important part of the housing jigsaw.